lattice
cabinet | prototype

その多くが壁際に置かれ、ほとんどの人が正面に対峙するキャビネット。そのデザインを考える上でもっとも重要で印象に残るものは「扉」であり「取手」です。特に取手はデザインのキーとなり、場合によっては商品の個性そのものとなりえます。しかし、ここではよりシンプルで主張せず、空間に馴染むものをという思いから、“取手をなくすこと”から考えました。そこから行き着いたのが日本の伝統的な建築様式の一つである「障子」です。障子とは、木製の細い角材を格子状に組み、その骨組みに和紙を貼った採光可能な引き戸です。手を掛ける部分があるものも多く存在しますが、特別に手を掛ける部分を設けず組まれた格子そのものを取手として機能させるものも多く存在します。規則正しく並んだ格子は構造体でありながら、取手でもあり、さらに意匠としても機能するのです。そんな「障子の格子」を取り入れることで、シンプルでありながら機能的な「扉」ができました。さらに和紙の代わりにテキスタイルを用いることで、シャープなデザインにやさしい表情を持たせ、よりインテリアに馴染むようにしました。棚板は可動式にすることで、収納物に合わせて変化させることが可能です。そうして、機能的で空間に馴染む今までにないキャビネットが生まれました。

Cabinets are generally placed against the wall, so we almost face them from the front when we look at and use them. Since they are designed to be placed this way, their doors and handles leave the greatest impression. The handles are of particular importance in their design, and are often the most characteristic feature of the product. However, our idea was to make an even simpler, unassertive design that blends in with its surroundings; a design without an obvious handhold. This led us to the shoji, a part of traditional Japanese architecture. Shojis are translucent sliding doors constructed from a frame of thin wood pieces fitted together in a rectangular grid on which Japanese paper is glued. Often, they have a place where you can put your hand to open them, but since they have a grid construction, any part can be used as a handle, so a lot of them are made without any particular handhold. While the regularly arranged grid is their structure, it also functions as a handle, as well as its design. Implementing this shoji grid, we achieved a simple yet functional door. Replacing the Japanese paper with a textile gives gentleness to a sharp design that easily blends with your interior. The shelves are moveable, so they can be arranged to suit what is being stored. The result is a new style of cabinet that is functional and blends in.